Tuesday 1 23 18 morning call

A shortboard and a windsurf sessions for me yesterday. First one was a 10 (for my very personal standards), second one was pretty wild. With three solid swells still in the water (NW, NNW and E) plus the wind chop, the surface of the open ocean was a mess. Just to keep the board planing, I had to do a constant leg workout to absorb the bumps. It wasn’t the usual sequence of crests and troughs, it was more like a random number of crests and throughs all adding on top of each other. Nonetheless, that made the planing action really fun and engaging for a change. Around 4pm the Pauwela buoy was reading a remarkable 4.5f 18s and Hookipa looked totally epic. Some big closeout sets suggested me to sail somewhere else though, but I still got to ride a couple of dreamy clean waves like this one below.

Photo by Jimmie Hepp from from this gallery.

4am significant buoy readings
South shore

No indication of southerly energy at the buoys, but we’ve learned that that doesn’t mean there isn’t any. As I reported in the morning from the beach, the waves on the Lahaina side were a solid waist to chest high with occasional bigger sets. I’m going again today (got to get out of the damn wind), stay tuned for a beach report. The Surfline forecast calls for 2.4f 14s at 8am.

North shore
NW101
6.5ft @ 16s from 289° (WNW)

Waimea
5.5ft @ 17s from 307° (WNW)

Pauwela

6.3ft @ 10s from 76° (ENE)
5.5ft @ 16s from 317° (NW)
3.6ft @ 6s from 73° (ENE)
 
Sunday’s old NW swell disappeared from the buoys, but there’s still some solid numbers from yesterday’s new one plus the easterly windswell. Below are the graphs of the three reported buoys showing that the swell should hold all day locally (red dotted line) before declining tomorrow. Notice also how it went more west at the NW101 buoy (red circle in the direction graph which is below the size graph). Lastly, notice how the Pauwela graph looks exactly like the Surfline forecast I posted yesterday.

Wind map at noon shows easterly trades.

North Pacific shows 2 WNW fetches, a lovely N one and a E one.

Nothing of relevance in the South Pacific.

Morning sky.

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