Cheapflights creates drag-and-drop banner ads for event and flight search

AdSense

Consumer-facing brands have always needed to make their display advertising as engaging as possible – with the goal, obviously, of selling more stuff.

But for ultra competitive travel brands, such a task can be difficult when often the only message available is the price of a flight, a hotel, or the apparent wonderful aspects of a particular destination.

Still, give the problem to a bunch of brainaics at Cheapflights and see what they can come up with.

Starting this week, Momondo Group-owned Cheapflights will start placing banner ads on media sites such as the Guardian, NME, et al, specfically alongside content relating to sports, music and the arts.

The call to action is to drag the picture from the editorial content to the ad, and then some tech kung fu takes place.

The ad does a search for a flight and displays the price for a ticket to a destination relating to the content.

For example, on an article about Barcelona football team, the ad will show the flight prices from the user’s location to the next game; or, an album review for a band will, when the picture is dragged across, show prices for flights to a gig on the accompanying tour.

The user can then click through to a landing page on Cheapflights that pre-populates the search results with the existing cheapest, quickest or smartest fare.

The tool works by using a range of APIs, covering image search, ticket platforms (such as Ticketmaster), location and the core Cheapflights back-end.

Managing director Andrew Shelton says:

“There were nearly 10 million ‘event tourists’ in the UK alone in 2014, and it’s a rapidly growing sector among the Cheapflights user demographic with people willing to travel for major sports events, music gigs and art exhibitions around the world.

“But until now it’s not always been that easy to find the next event and research how to get there.”

Research from lobbying group UK Music in 2014 found that 45% of live music audiences, for example, were so-called “music tourists – those travelling to a destination specifically to watch a gig, rather than in their hometown.

Here is a demo of the “Drag, Drop and Go” tool:

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